Gustav III's Pavilion

Gustav III's Pavilion

It was from here that King Gustav III set off for the fateful masquerade ball at the Royal Swedish Opera in March 1792. His pavilion in Stockholm's Haga Park is decorated in Pompeian style. It is a highlight of Swedish art history, and is one of the leading works from the late 18th century.

Gustav III´s Pavilion at Haga Park is one of the highlights of Swedish art history and is one of the finest examples of the European Neo-Classicism of the late 1700s in Northern Europe.

The pavilion was built by architect Olof Tempelman – with detailed instructions from the highly-engaged King Gustav III. Yet another great artist was commissioned for the interiors – Louis Masreliez – who became a trendsetter in the interior design of the period.

The interiors of the Gustav III Pavilion can be viewed during the summer months when the pavilion is open for guided tours.

The pavilion was just one of many great plans and visions that Gustav III had for Haga Park, many of which made it no further than the drawing board.

Gustav III made use of the pavilion for a few years before his assassination. It was from here that Gustav III left for the fateful masquerade ball at the Opera in March 1792.

Photo: Raphael Stecksén/Royalpalaces.se

Visit us

Follow along on a guided tour and hear about the Pavilion’s royal history, the history of the building itself and the preserved furnishin...

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For large groups we recommend a pre-booked guided tour. Pre-booked tours can be given between June–August.

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Discover more at Gustav III's Pavilion

Gustav III’s pavilion at Haga is, from a European perspective, one of the most unusual royal buildings from the late 18th century. Not le...

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In the summer of 1766, soon after they were married, the heir apparent, Gustav (III) and Sofia Magdalena rented Haga, a small property ju...

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The Copper Tents houses Haga Park Museum and a café. Until 16 September it is also housing sale from the Royal Gift Shop.

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Situated in Stockholm City and part of the Royal National City Park, Haga Park is one of Sweden's most-visited recreation area.

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Articles and movies

During the summer, all ten royal palaces and their museums, parks, chapels, shops and cafés will be open.

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Haga bears witness to King Gustav III's yearning for a rural idyll and great luxury. The guests invited here by the king include the poet...

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Customer service

Opening hours: Closed

FAQ

  • Can I take a pushchair into the royal palaces?

    Pushchairs are not permitted indoors.

  • Are there any pushchair parkings at the royal palaces?

    The Royal Palace of Stockholm: At the entrance to the Reception Rooms, in the Outer Courtyard there is a limited amount of space for pushchairs. Under cover, but unmonitored and no locking facility.

    Riddarholm Church: At the entrance to Riddarholm Church. Under cover, but unmonitored and no locking facility.

    Drottningholm Palace: Outside the entrance. Under cover, but unmonitored and no locking facility.

    Other visitor attractions: No pushchair parking.

  • Which royal visitor attractions can I explore at my own pace?

    The Royal Palace of Stockholm, Riddarholm Church, Drottningholm Palace, the Chinese Pavilion, Gripsholm Castle, Strömsholm Palace and the Orangery at Ulriksdal can be explored at your own pace.

    The other palaces are by guided tour.

  • Is it possible to hire rooms at the royal palaces for dinner functions/events?

    Strömsholm Palace: The dining room in the Stone Kitchen can be hired for dinner functions.

    The other palaces: Room hire is not possible.

  • Are audio guides available for the royal palaces?

    The Royal Palace of Stockholm: An audio guide in Swedish and English is available for the Bernadotte Apartments and Gustav III’s Museum of Antiquities.

    The Chinese Pavilion: An audio guide is available in Swedish and English

    Audio guides are not available at present for the other palaces.

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